Review of Celestron Amoeba Microscope!

An honest, unscientific review of a digital microscope

There’s probably nothing more fun than playing around with a super cool microscope -especially if there’s nobody telling you what to do or how to do it. With that being said, I checked out Celestron’s digital microscope, the Amoeba.

Things went pretty well. Some slides came with the set so I gave a few a try. Overall, I hope to provide some understandable insight into how this particular digital microscope works, the image quality and it’s pros and cons.

First I went with the “Fowl Feather” at 10X the magnification. Inserting the slide went easily. I went without any problems in getting the stage clips in place.

Photo on 10-21-14 at 3.14 PM

“Fowl Feather” at 10X the magnification.

Next, at 200X here’s the result:

“Fowl Feather” at 200X the magnification.

“Fowl Feather” at 200X the magnification.

As I attempted to take pictures of “Bamboo Stem” I encountered my first problem. When turning the dial to increase the magnification, the whole microscope kept moving. It was too light! This then became a tad irritating as the pictures were blurry and hard to take. The same problem occurred whilst turning the coarse focus (The little knob on the side).

The following images of bamboo stem show what the microscope takes at 60X and 200x.

“Bamboo Stem” at 60X magnification.

“Bamboo Stem” at 60X magnification.

“Bamboo Stem” at 200X the magnification.

“Bamboo Stem” at 200X the magnification.

In taking these pictures, no real problems occurred. However, the picture at 200X magnification looks a little blurry.

And finally, to get a general idea of how defined the microscope could go, I decided to take a picture of some color printed text.

Color text on the Amoeba at 200x magnification.

Color text on the Amoeba at 200x magnification.

And for reference, here’s an image of some color text from another microscope to compare it to:

Color text on another microscope at 200x magnification.

Color text on another microscope at 200x magnification.

In comparing the two, the first image appears less defined and more blurry than the other. Honestly, though the photographs are not too far apart. Considering the fact that the second microscope comes at a much higher price point.

Overall, I’d say that Celestron’s Amoeba does a good job. It’s easy to use and looks cool. Here I’ll list out some Pros and Cons:

Pros

– Top and bottom led illumination. Top illumination allows observation of non-transparent objects.

– Detachable body allows viewing things that can’t be prepared in a slide.

– Takes up less that 10 square inches of desk top space.

Cons

– Adjustment of the lens can be difficult to focus correctly due to the lightweight design. By turning the coarse focus I tended to move the whole microscope.

–  The capture button on the top does nothing.

Please tell me what you think of this review below!

Dylan Schreiner

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